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December 13, 2011 "The thing that separates the real successful from the not so successful is they continue learning everyday, to seek different information from all over the world, and to learn from their mistakes. The world is changing every day," closed Udi Manber to Woodland Poly students at their assembly on Dec. 2.

"We were excited that a gentleman, with his credentials, from Google would come to our campus," shared Woodland Poly freshman, John Sanchez.

Offering inspiration that all things are possible to the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors at Woodland's first charter high school, Manber described Google's beginning -- starting in a garage in 1998 -- to becoming a $30 billion company, with offices all over the world, and 30,000 employees. "We run hundreds of millions of searches a day. The complexity of doing that is beyond belief and mind-boggling. Most of the $30 billion in revenues come 50 cents at a time," marveled Manber.

"We were not the first or the fifth search engine; we just did it better, concentrating on quality and relevancy of the results," Manber shared proudly.

Holding 65 percent of the search market, Google is different than most companies. "We look a little like a summer camp with free food 24 hours a day, free drinks, a gym, and frequent parties, but working for Google is working hard. One hundred years ago, companies were looking only for efficiency and making things cheaper, with often horrendous working conditions. Today, quality counts more. We're looking for people who are curious, innovative, who can get things done. And to keep the most talented people, we treat them extremely well," cited Manber.

Receiving his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Washington, Manber's accomplishments are impressive: CEO of A9.com, Senior Vice President at Amazon, Yahoo's Chief Scientist, Professor at the University of Arizona, recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, and co-developer of numerous search engines. To a question asked by a Woodland Poly student, Manber responded, "Yes, most of the jobs at Google require a college degree, for example in engineering, computer science, business, and psychology."

"In keeping with our mission to provide an exceptional educational experience, the founders, staff and Board members of Woodland Poly were pleased to be able to introduce this extraordinary leader, Udi Manber," shared Executive Director Steve Marks, Jr.

"The richest person in the world, 15 years ago, didn't have access to the information that Woodland Poly students have today," declared Manber.

Woodland Polytechnic Academy is a tuition-free public charter school that opened this fall, serving grades 9,10 and 11 in the 2011-12 school year, while expanding to serving grades 9-12 in the 2012-13 school year. For Freshmen interested in enrolling in Woodland Poly for the 2012-13 school year, applications will be accepted December 15, 2011 through January 20, 2012. Applications will be available on December 15th at Woodland Poly's campus located on the Yolo County Fairgrounds or on their website. More information is available at 530-219-2542 or www.woodlandpoly.org.

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